The Musings of a Nerd-Girl searching for her own "Looking-Glass"...Preferably without the pot.

questionableadvice:

~ The Duties of a Ladies’ Maid; with Directions for Conduct, and Numerous Receipts for the Toilette, James Bulcock, 1825

:/

questionableadvice:

~ The Duties of a Ladies’ Maid; with Directions for Conduct, and Numerous Receipts for the Toilette, James Bulcock, 1825

:/

girlwithalessonplan:

itssnix:

tomesawayfromhome:

I was nearly done grading essays when I hit a field of comma land mines.

This was my most common error in HS essays. That and “wordy and vague.” I wish MY teacher had said this. ;)

My comma comment is “These are not confetti!”  

Haha I’m grading like this one day.

girlwithalessonplan:

itssnix:

tomesawayfromhome:

I was nearly done grading essays when I hit a field of comma land mines.

This was my most common error in HS essays. That and “wordy and vague.” I wish MY teacher had said this. ;)

My comma comment is “These are not confetti!”  

Haha I’m grading like this one day.

(Source: tomes-away)

coolchicksfromhistory:

Cloe Weaver, mother of four children, employed as a helper at the roundhouse, Clinton, Iowa. She is learning to operate the turntable.
1943

Strong women

coolchicksfromhistory:

Cloe Weaver, mother of four children, employed as a helper at the roundhouse, Clinton, Iowa. She is learning to operate the turntable.

1943

Strong women

ourpresidents:

On September 25, 1981, Sandra Day O’Connor became the first woman to be sworn in as a Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. 
President Reagan had nominated O’Connor earlier that summer, and he wrote in his White House diary, “Called Judge O’Connor in  Ariz. and told her she was my nominee for Supreme Ct. Already the flack is starting and from my own supporters… I think she’ll make a good Justice.”
O’Connor helped inspire a generation of women to pursue careers in law—when she was appointed,  thirty-six percent of law school students were women; by the time she retired from the court in 2006 that percentage had risen to forty-eight percent.
Last year, O’Connor spoke to a group of high school students at the Reagan Presidential Library in Simi Valley and told them:

“It was exciting to be the first, but I did not want to be the last.”

Photo: Sandra Day O’Connor being sworn in as Supreme Court Justice by Chief Justice Warren Burger.  Her husband, John O’Connor looks on.  9/25/81.
More from the Center for Legislative Archives


One of my heros.

ourpresidents:

On September 25, 1981, Sandra Day O’Connor became the first woman to be sworn in as a Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. 

President Reagan had nominated O’Connor earlier that summer, and he wrote in his White House diary, “Called Judge O’Connor in  Ariz. and told her she was my nominee for Supreme Ct. Already the flack is starting and from my own supporters… I think she’ll make a good Justice.”

O’Connor helped inspire a generation of women to pursue careers in lawwhen she was appointed,  thirty-six percent of law school students were women; by the time she retired from the court in 2006 that percentage had risen to forty-eight percent.

Last year, O’Connor spoke to a group of high school students at the Reagan Presidential Library in Simi Valley and told them:

“It was exciting to be the first, but I did not want to be the last.”

Photo: Sandra Day O’Connor being sworn in as Supreme Court Justice by Chief Justice Warren Burger.  Her husband, John O’Connor looks on.  9/25/81.

More from the Center for Legislative Archives

One of my heros.

coolchicksfromhistory:

Carolina Coronado by Federico de Madrazo y Kuntz, circa 1855, Museo del Prado, Madrid.
Carolina Coronado (1820-1911) was a Spanish Romantic poet, novelist, and playwright.  Many of her early poems were about her lover Alberto (Nada resta de ti), who may or may not have existed.  She swore off marriage when Alberto died at sea, but eventually married US diplomat Horatio Perry.
The position of women in Spanish society was a major theme in Carolina’s work, one of her earliest published poems condemned wife beating (El marido verdugo).  After she became a well known poet, Carolina promoted other female poets through a newspaper series.  Through her poems she also repeatedly condemned slavery, both in the US and Spanish controlled Cuba.  
Carolina suffered from catalepsy which induces a catatonic state and may explain her unusual way of dealing with grief.  In 1873, Carolina’s teenage daughter Carolinita passed away. Carolina had her body embalmed and stored in a Madrid convent.  Eight years later while living in Portugal, Horatio died and Carolina had his body embalmed and placed in a chapel beside her bedroom.  She visited him daily for the next twenty years until she too passed away.  After Carolina died, her son in law had the bodies of Carolina, Horatio, and Carolinita buried.  

coolchicksfromhistory:

Carolina Coronado by Federico de Madrazo y Kuntz, circa 1855, Museo del Prado, Madrid.

Carolina Coronado (1820-1911) was a Spanish Romantic poet, novelist, and playwright.  Many of her early poems were about her lover Alberto (Nada resta de ti), who may or may not have existed.  She swore off marriage when Alberto died at sea, but eventually married US diplomat Horatio Perry.

The position of women in Spanish society was a major theme in Carolina’s work, one of her earliest published poems condemned wife beating (El marido verdugo).  After she became a well known poet, Carolina promoted other female poets through a newspaper series.  Through her poems she also repeatedly condemned slavery, both in the US and Spanish controlled Cuba.  

Carolina suffered from catalepsy which induces a catatonic state and may explain her unusual way of dealing with grief.  In 1873, Carolina’s teenage daughter Carolinita passed away. Carolina had her body embalmed and stored in a Madrid convent.  Eight years later while living in Portugal, Horatio died and Carolina had his body embalmed and placed in a chapel beside her bedroom.  She visited him daily for the next twenty years until she too passed away.  After Carolina died, her son in law had the bodies of Carolina, Horatio, and Carolinita buried.